01.21.19

Senator David Perdue Honors Dr. King At Ebenezer Baptist Church

“Dr. King gave us hope during some of this country’s darkest days. He changed America forever.”

ATLANTA, GA – U.S. Senator David Perdue (R-GA) honors the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during the annual commemorative service at historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Click here or on the image below to watch his remarks.

MLK

Transcript:

“On April 16, 1963 from a jail cell in Birmingham, Alabama, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote a letter to the local clergy defending his commitment to peaceful direct action. In this letter, you can see the soul of a patriot, the soul of a man who was destined to change the direction of an entire country. Over time, this letter became very personal to me.

“I grew up in America in the 1960s. Racism was real. Segregation was real. Discrimination was real. I remember how this weighed on my parents. They were simple schoolteachers, and all they wanted was for every child to be treated the same regardless of where they came from, what their name was, or the color of their skin.

“Put simply, my dad revered Dr. King. Growing up, I remember my father using Dr. King as an example of a leader who was not afraid to do the right thing. He was not afraid to challenge the status quo and injustice. He was not afraid to teach us how to get along with each other. He also taught us about adversity. As Dr. King once said, ‘the ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy’ – much like today.

“In 1961, my dad became Superintendent of Schools in Houston County in Georgia. He integrated the schools and was one of the first in the state of Georgia to do so. He said it was simply the right thing to do. He did it in the face of great adversity. He used Dr. King as an example all the way through. Dr. King was an inspiration for my father.

“Dr. King gave us hope during some of this country’s darkest days. He changed America forever. Our country has overcome a lot, but there is much yet to be done. We need today to reflect on the ideals of Dr. Martin Luther King – the things he fought for, the things he died for. He often reminded us that what unites us is far greater than what divides us. Though we may talk differently, look differently, or have different political views, he would remind us we are one nation under God.

“The closing sentence of the Declaration of Independence says, ‘And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of God, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.’ In this Birmingham letter, Dr. King wrote, ‘Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.’ My father quoted that more times than I can tell you.

“The closing words of that letter are as meaningful today as they were then. ‘Let us all hope that the dark clouds of racial prejudice will soon pass away and the deep fog of misunderstanding will be lifted from our fear-drenched communities and in some not too distant tomorrow, the radiant stars of love and brotherhood will shine over our great nation with all their scintillating beauty.’

“God bless you for being here. Thank you God for Dr. Martin Luther King.”

###

Senator Perdue is the only Fortune 500 CEO in Congress and is serving his first term in the United States Senate, where he represents Georgia on the Armed Services, Banking, Budget, and Agriculture Committees.